The Pillars Of Successful Artist Management.

Each one has a role to play. An artist can’t rely solely on his talent to succeed. Neither can a manager have feathers in his cap without developing his artist to achieve success.

Managers may have different artist management styles but there are 3 things that work for all of them.

Partnership Built On Trust

This is the foundation of a great team. Some may say, it’s a partnership made in heaven! The connection is solid and deep. It’s where you see the artist and manager working together to build a brand – creating music that people want to buy. The artist’s talent is showcased. The manager’s skills are put to a test … and both succeed. Trust in each other never fails to bring sweet success.

Solid Work Ethic

The music industry is a tough turf to break into. For an artist to make it big, artist mangers have a lot to do. Being hands on is a must. Being on top of things is an every day task. That’s why a strong work ethic that is shared by both artist and manager is important. It’s a potent ingredient of the partnership. It gets the job done well. Combine this with a positive attitude and a joyful heart – that’s when great things happen. Afterall, creating music is a passion that springs from the heart. It’s good to let others enjoy the fruit of your labor.

Shared Passion And Vision

Music has a way of getting people together. Artist and manager share one desire —to pursue success through music. Artist explores and creates his music. Manager employs artist management strategies to make it marketable, get record labels to recognize it and give it airtime so people buy it. You know success will not happen overnight. Things happens one step at a time. Be patient, every small step will lead to bigger steps. Your vision of success is clear. Keep your eye on it. Success is your north star.

To succeed in the music industry, artists have explored different paths. There may have been rough roads, with risky twist and turns. Some may have failed at first. Some may have taken longer to get to where they want to. Time and again, with a strong partnership, a solid work ethic and an undaunted passion for their craft and their vision to succeed, many talented music artists found their way to their ultimate success.

These are time-proven pillars of success in artist management. There are professionals who have the experience and skills to make the path to success

easier and faster. Check out http://360mediatouring.com/artist-management/ They have been in the music business for 21 years and know all about managing songwriters, artists and bands.360 Media Touring Management group who can help steer music careers of freshArticle Search, new music talents like you.

How to Promote Your Music by Gigging

The problem of how to promote your music is one of the main challenges facing
any band or musician who wants to be a success. Even when your act or material
is established, building your fan base and selling your CDs or mp3s is all
about exposing people to your music. Basically, if you don’t know how to
promote your music, how will you get people to buy what you write or play?

1. Learn how to get band bookings from venues

Clearly you’re never going to know how to promote your music at gigs if you
can’t get your band booking. So, learning how to do this is a key requirement.

Getting gigs boils down to:

a) Working out what’s different
about your band

b) Drawing up a long list of
target venues

c) Agreeing between band members
how many band bookings you want to play every week or month

 d) Creating a demo

e) Hitting the phones to canvas
your long list of venues

Oh, and of course… rehearsing.

More band
booking tips
here


2. Get people to come to your gigs.

So, once you’ve mastered the art of how to promote your music to venues, you
need to get people in through the door to watch you play on gig night.

You should do this both on and offline. Online, think your Facebook, Twitter
and Youtube accounts to advertise your gigs. Also, your own website should be
collecting email addresses so you can email newsletters with details of the
event. Offline Press releases, flyers and verbally telling everyone you know
about your forthcoming gigs.

3. Play Great Shows

Many bands and musicians learn how to get band bookings and even then to
fill venues on gig night. You can set yourself apart from other acts when you
know how to promote your music by putting on great shows every time you
play. The key points are:

-Creating the confidence to perform

-Knowing your material inside out (so
you can concentrate on the “show”

-Planning the show in advance

and crucially:

-Interacting with your crowd

More about playing great shows here

Once you can get band bookings, get people to your gigs and put on a great
show, here’s how you can make the most of every gig to promote your music.

1. Use audience reactions to help fine-tune your song arrangements and to
test new material

2. Sell your music (CD’s) and merchandise at the gigs

3. Publicise your website and social media at the gigs (think flyers and
on-mic announcements)

4. Book repeat gigs at the same venue on gig night itself and publicise this
to the crowd

These will all help build your fan-base over time – a key ingredient in
knowing how to promote your music.

When you’ve mastered all the above it may be time to:

5. Invite industry contacts to your shows

A&R people if getting signed is your goal, band management or just
booking agents for bands if you want someone to handle that side for you.

No matter what your ultimate musical aim is, playing band bookings will do
more than help create a buzz about your band and music.  When you know how
to promote your music this way it drives your motivation and builds
momentum for your musical career. And, it will put some extra cash in your
pocket at the same time.

Support Music Education

”;

I support music education because it has played a vital role in my
life. I had very difficult behavioral challenges as a child. I was
defiant. I was expelled from three schools and was hospitalized three
times because of mental, emotional and behavioral challenges. I was
diagnosed with depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and a
behavior disorder.At the end of tenth grade, my defiance was at
its peak and contributed to my third expulsion from school. Like a
defiant child, I told my parents that I was not going back to school
unless they found a way for me to play the drums more during the school
day.Weeks later, my mother discovered the Long Island High School for the
Arts. I was accepted and life changed for me completely. My
grades went up, my behavior improved, and I discovered my mission in
life. This is how I reaped the benefits of music education. I remember
my adolescence as a time of life-changing transformation. Today I am
honored to mentor musically-minded teens on the faculty at the Long Island High School for the
Arts.Now I am a professional drummer and I love my
job. I am happy, healthy, and I am in control of my own behavior.
Instead of defiance, I’ve found positive ways to express myself. Like
everyone, I suffer from periodic stress. When I sit behind my drums and
play, I experience relief, emotional expression, and a wonderful
connection with other people.Music education is extremely
beneficial for children and adults. If you type “benefits of music
education” into a search engine you will discover tons of research done
on the positive effects music education has on people. The best-known
benefits of music education are improved SAT scores, literacy, and
social skills.One famous study was done by Profiles of SAT and
Achievement Test Takers, The College Board, 1998. The researchers who
conducted this study concluded that students who participate in music
score higher on the SAT. Another popular SAT study showed that students
who performed music scored 57 points higher on the verbal and 41 points
higher on the math, than those who were not musical. Students who take
music appreciation classes score 63 points higher on the verbal and 44
points higher on the math, compared to students who don’t participate
in the arts.Although much of the research about music education
focuses on children, there are many benefits of music education for
adults. According to a study done by the American Music Conference in
1998, retired adults who took keyboard classes reported decreased
anxiety, decreased depression, and decreased loneliness when compared
to a control group. I believe that music education is just as important
for adults as it is for children.As a proud supporter of the
Fender Music
Foundation (formerly the Guitar Center Music Foundation), I
encourage you to support music education. You can do this through
becoming an advocate or making a donation. When you purchase anything
through my website, www.MikeVeny.com, a portion
of your purchase will be donated to the Fender Music
Foundation. Music education has improved my life a great
deal, and I hope you will join me in supporting it. Please make
learning music a part of your life.

Article Tags:
Support Music Education, Support Music, Music Education, Points Higher, Music Foundation

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
www.MikeVeny.com

Trust professional entertainment agents to find you the best live band

”;

For any entertainment event one of the must haves is music. And when we talk music during an entertainment event what is needed is a live music band. Thankfully, the UK has always had a rich heritage in music and there is no lack of fine musicians playing some of the finest music of all times. These bands can play music of all times from all decades. These live bands can be found online and hired. Entertainment hire through online entertainment agents takes at best half an hour.Finding live music bands, if you try to go by the way of yellow pages, could be a daunting task. There are thousands of live music bands available all over the country. When you talk to them you will feel that each one is better than the previous one. You don’t have a mechanism to gauge how good a particular band is. But when you go for entertainment hire through online entertainment agents you can actually follow a systematic way to identify the best.If there is a wedding ceremony that you are hosting you would want a live music band to entertain the guests. Instead of finding a professional live music band among so many available, what you will need to do is find a professional, online entertainment agent. If you do this task well there will be no need for you to look elsewhere for entertainment hire.There are some professional entertainment agents that have been in the business of entertainment hire for a long time. Some are actually in business for more than a decade. And now that they are present online, finding them becomes that much easy. All you need to do is search online using the keywords online entertainment agents and there will be plenty to choose from.Spend some time on the websites of some of the top listed online entertainment agents and you will be able to identify the one you want to deal with. Entertainment hire through the shortlisted online entertainment agent will be very easy. They will ask you about the type of event you are hosting, the date of the event, the type of live music band you are looking for, the venue and your budget. Give them the inputs and they will list all the live music bands that fit your criteria.Now spend some time researching the listed live music bands. See whether they are based out of and see the number of band members and the type of music they play. Also find out their rating on the website and the level of recommendation. If needed click the appropriate link to find out more about them and also ensure that they are within your budget. You will take about half an hour to finalize one.This is the easiest method for entertainment hire through online entertainment agents. Try out this method and see how easy hiring a live band can be. A professional band will add a few stars to your event.Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Entertainment hire could be a really challenging task when you are looking for someone apt for the occasion. But online entertainment agents make light work of this task. You just need to find a professional one.

Music Licensing – The Basics – Part 1 License Agreements

In this digital age using music in web-based presentations, business applications, products or services has a number of legal implications for you and your business. Minimising copyright issues can be relatively simple and a little knowledge about music licensing can set you off in the right direction and keep you safe for the future.

This two-part article will provide a basic understanding of music licensing and the royalties included in a license agreement. It will serve you well when licensing music and is a starting point for more in-depth research.

Put simply, you need a license in order to use music legally. Whether you are using music at home or in a commercial project it will require a license. In the example of home use, the CD you buy from a music store is a license to listen for your own personal pleasure. You are not able to reproduce it or broadcast it in any way.

If you wish to use music as part of your business or in a commercial project you will need to get the relevant licenses depending on your usage. The fee you will have to pay will vary depending on the scope of your project and whether the music is mainstream.

Arranging clearance to use mainstream music can be a complicated process and can require a large budget. In comparison, using original music from an independent composer is less complicated to license and can easily fit into your budget.

The Agreement

When you purchase a license you are paying a fee to have certain rights assigned to you for a defined period. This is subject to the terms and conditions of the agreement. Your agreement will detail where and how you can use the music and will also point out the limits or restrictions of the license. The copyright does not become yours, it remains with the composer – you have only been assigned some of the rights.

Music can be licensed on an exclusive or non-exclusive arrangement.

An exclusive agreement means that you are the sole user during the life of the agreement and nobody else can use it for the same purpose.

Non-exclusive usage means that anyone can license the music at anytime.

Music is traditionally licensed within certain territories of the world. This is because the royalty collection societies tend to operate within their own country rather than globally.

Recently, there has been an increase in digital delivery of music with agreements covering worldwide use that bypass the royalty collection societies.

Strange but true, some license agreements even make provision for intergalactic use!

The term is the period of time that you are able to license the music for. This can be from as little as one day or as much as 100 years.

In order to include music in a product or production you have to pay what is known as the synchronisation or sync fee. There are no standard prices set by the industry for a sync fee and the fee can be open to negotiation.

The mechanical royalty covers the number of duplications you wish to make of your product. The mechanical royalty collecting societies have set rates for these, however, some composers / companies are now starting to use digital delivery and will license music directly without using the collecting societies. This can get you a better deal and give you the rights to produce a specified number of reproductions within the license agreement.

Performance royalties are due anytime music is broadcast on websites, TV, radio, podcasts, etc, or played at public exhibitions, events, public houses etc.

Quite often a license agreement will exclude coverage of these, making it the responsibility of the person or company broadcasting the music. This involves paying an additional fee to the performance royalty collecting societies. Many Royalty Free licenses operate in this manner.

There are occasions where a company or composer will cover the performance element in the license fee you pay, but you have to be clear about thisScience Articles, either by negotiating with the composer or checking the small print before purchasing.

Music licensing is a lot simpler to understand once you know the basic components of an agreement and what they actually cover.

Part one of this article should have given you a good basic knowledge of licensing agreements. Part two explores the options available to you as a music licensee.

Career in Music ahead of Vocalist

Music is an integral part of mankind. It is woven into the very fabric of human civilization. One can make a bright career path in music just by attaining the desired skills & temperament. There are several music schools in India that provide proficient music education and help an aspirant to pursue a musical career.

Music is a passion to many of us and sometimes we just do not want to listen to it but also want to make it a creative part of our lives. There are chances that if you have just enough talent to make it, you can design a great career in field of music. 

Music industry is a tough one as there is a very high level of competition with so many pursuers already lurking around. But those who have made it into being a professional have all gone big. Music careers have gained a lot of respect in past few years. There are lot of music colleges in Delhi which offer best courses which can help you with your career ahead. The opportunities in field of music have also been more in last few years because of media and broadcasting industry. The largest of all opportunities in this field comes from Bollywood. 

Apart from being a vocalist there are other opportunities in music as well. You can be a specialist instrument player; can be a part of production, music composition and lyrics writing, production, being a RJ or a DJ, a technical expert in the studio or the sound recorder. Music journalism is also an important sectorFeature Articles, if you have special interest in music and are familiar with the existing trends in the department.   

Once you receive a degree in music from any top music academy in Delhi which has a great syllabus and efficient faculty you might be looking up on a career opportunity of a lifetime. The basic technical and theoretical knowledge are as important as the practical lessons. Students must take the complete syllabus very seriously as it will keep multiple windows open for them.

The money involved in this is a tricky business as it differs from the kind of work you are doing to the department which you have pursued.  Money should not be an initial concern for the newbies as there would be lot of good opportunities on the way ahead. One should always try to get good work done and be a part of good projects even if the payment is minimal. If your work is recognised at any point of time you may be able to earn beyond what you had initially thought of. Try to get in touch with the best artists and personalities from the industry and take healthy tips from them. This will help you build a personality.

The Country & Motown Sessions

Shelley Hamilton Entertainment Presents – 

The Country & Motown Sessions 

PRICE

FREE

TIMES / VENUES

Sunday, September 1

4:00pm – 5:30pm

Stage in the Round

235 Queens Quay West

Let’s take our hearts back to such favorites as Diana Ross and the Supremes, Sam Cooke, And of course the queen of soul Aretha Franklin. Backed by Rudy and The Angels, a five piece band with horns, Shelley gives honor to legendary musical groups of the 60s and 70s – a throwback to old soul for the young at heart.

And as Black Canadian woman breaking out into the country scene? Not the norm, but But the time come with her album SHELLA with musical artist & writer Stella Panacci. Since it’s release she has been a featured artists of the week for CBC, & CTV Morning Live in May 2019. SHE is also part of the collective “The Afro Métis Nation“ and their album “Constitution” released in 2019 celebrating mixed culture of Blacks and Indigenous people of NS. Shelley will be doing an intimate acoustic set of some of her original pieces, including the song of the week picked by CBC in February, her country remake of Drake’s “Hold On We’re Going Home”

Ten Of The Most Common Mistakes To Avoid If You Are An Unsigned Artist

Here are 10 of the most common mistakes I have seen new unsigned artists make.

THE TEN MOST COMMON MISTAKES A NEW ARTIST MAKES

1) THEY DON’T KNOW WHO THEY ARE AND WHO THE AUDIENCE IS THAT THEY ARE TRYING TO REACH.Can you identify your target market? Do you know their age group? Are they primarily male or female? What artists do they listen to and support? What image should you project to reach this audience?

2) THEY MISS THEIR “ONLY” CHANCE TO MAKE A GREAT “FIRST IMPRESSION”. You only get one chance to make a first impression so the one you do make has got it make it count! It will hurt you in the long run if you are impulsive about sending your recordings in for evaluation or posting them on the web before they’re ready to be heard.

3) THEY ARE NOT ABLE TO “PULL IT OFF” LIVE. You need to play out live as much as possible – but only when you are truly ready to do so. Nothing will hurt you more than to create excitement in your recordings and then fall on your face in front of expectant fans live.

4) THEY RELY TO HEAVILY ON THE OPINIONS THOSE AROUND THEM. I can’t tell you the number of times I have been in preproduction with a band or artist who was trying to make a case for a song to be included on a CD because their aunt, uncle or next door neighbor thought it was a hit. Be especially careful not to make critical decisions based only on comments from adoring friends and family. Undoubtedly they are biased and will have a vested stake in your success.

5) THEY TRY TO LAUNCH WITH TO MANY SONGS. Even thought it’s tempting, never give away all of your material at one time. You will be doing extremely well if you perfect three or four songs first. Always lead with your best material but make sure that your direction is cohesive.

6) THEY TRY TO BE COOL AND WRITE OBSCURE LYRICS OR WANDER TO FAR AWAY FROM ACCEPTED SONG STRUCTURE. It used to be very hip to write lyrics that people had to try and figure out by debating them amongst each other but unless you are a “druggie” band or writer re-incarnated from the 70’s, it is much better to write you songs in the first person and try as much as possible to pack them with emotion and experiences others have felt and can relate to as well. Also, don’t think it’s cool to wait forever to get to the chorus or try a one-minute intro or guitar solo. Study pop structure and learn it. You can learn more about this issue at www.musicproshollywood.com.musicproshollywood.com

7) THEY JUMP IN TO SELF-RECORDING THEIR MUSIC WITHOUT ANY RECORDING EXPERIENCE. Obviously, the best option if you can afford it is to use an experienced recording engineer to record and mix your music. This may not be possible and today it is so tempting to make tracks on computers and bang them into a sequencer or hard drive system, put on a vocal, do a quick mix and call it a master. In order for your recordings to be competitive against the big artists that do have the great sounding tracks.

8) THEY RELEASE VIDEOS OF THEMSELVES BEFORE THEY ARE READY. Again, because the net offers such quick access to social sites, you may be tempted to start posting videos of rehearsals and performances before they are ready to be seen. You must make certain that what you are putting up is doing you justice. Remember, every time you post something or send it to someone you are inviting yourself to be judged.

9) THEY ARE TO ANXIOUS TO SIGN “ANY” CONTRACT. If you sign an agreement too early with a local manager, agent or your bass player’s father, you will pay dearly for it later when you need to get out of it in order to sign with real professionals who have the experience, contacts and leverage to make it happen for you. This is not to say that someone with little experience cannot work hard and get you to the top, but to make it as a world-class artist, it will happen faster with a professional team behind you.

10) THEY ARE IN A HURRY TO SIGN WITH A MAJOR. The decision to submit your material to a major is a tempting one and the tendency of many artists is to care more about chasing and getting the “deal” than the financial ramifications of what the deal means in the future after they’ve signed it. Most artists don’t realize the facts until too late,Be smart and polish your “diamond” firstFind Article, it might be priceless!

Importance of Music Managers

To appoint a manager is probably the most important decision, which a songwriter needs to take during his/her career as a professional musician. An ideal manager can make great impact on such a songwriter and musician’s career. Thus, it is extremely vital to make the artists understand about the worthiness of managers.

There are many benefits of hiring managers. They liaise with professionals such as accountants, concert organizers, producers, lawyers, publishing companies and with the creative team. They help in deciding what type of songs, which songwriters need to write for building a strong image in the music fraternity, as well as in the hearts of music lovers.

Some artists manage their schedules on their own, but as they get more engaged in the music industry, it is not possible to administer the work wholly. Hence, these managers come in handy at such times, as they also act as spokespersons, diplomats, mediators as well as authoritarians. 

As the career of the artist flourishes in the music industry, responsibilities too grow. Music managers assist singer songwriters at tours to help locate the right producers, strike the deals and develop relationships with different record labels, agents as well as publishers.

Other Duties of Music Managers:

These people help in launching the CDs of songwriters, conduct press conferences, plan promotional tours, book shows, look after the royalty and build the fan base. They also confirm that the name imprinted on the CD labels represent the correct name of songwriters.

Music managers also allot dates to musicians and see that the new albums of singer songwriters release on ideal time. While hiring the managers, artists need to verify their credentials. Hire the managers, who can perform multi tasks. They need to have a good temperament, excellent communication as well as PR (public relations) skills, because such managers can handle different aspects of an artist’s musical career.

These managers play an important role in shaping the career of an artist in the music industry. Even, singer songwriters, who wish to make a comeback in the music industry may benefit by hiring these music executives.

Indie Artist Management: Economic Realities & Insightful Strategies

Three personal managers of independent artists outline pathways for success in an increasingly competitive marketplace – a Los Angeles Music Network program, reported by Scott G (The G-Man).

“An artist’s music must be something I love,” stated Jennifer Yeko of True Talent Management. “It has to be music I want to hear in my personal life as well as when I’m working.”

This view was echoed by Ben Laski of Sonic Management, and Steve Ross of Raving Loon Management, as all three spoke on the Indie Artist Management program presented by the Los Angeles Music Network (LAMN).

“I will never work with an artist whose music I don’t love,” said Ross. “Commercial radio,” added Laski, “sucks, and so…” He waited for the applause to subside, “…and so, why would I want to work with anything other than music that means something to me?”

Each of them acknowledged the economic realities of the marketplace (“The product has to be viable at some point,” Ross pointed out), but all three were adamant that their personal reaction to an artist’s music was the primary factor in selecting them for representation. “It’s like a marriage,” said Ross, “so it’s best to make a careful choice.”

Speaking before an audience made up of equal numbers of indie managers and artists seeking information about management, Ross, Yeko and Laski provided insights into their approach to guiding recording artists to achieving commercial success as well as their maximum career potential.

Moderated by Tess Taylor, LAMN President, the event covered a lot of territory and generally moved rapidly from one topic to the next, although too much time was spent on answering repeated audience questions about California labor law dealing with booking agents.

Basically, no one may “procure employment” for a client in California unless they are a registered agent who has posted a bond and followed other formalities. Since this means that managers are putting their entire contractual relationship at risk if they book a gig for a client, there were a lot of managers in attendance who were hoping to find a loophole in the law.

Both Laski and Ross are attorneys, and Ross has obtained his agent license in order to book gigs for his clients.

During a spirited Q & A session following the formal part of the presentation, one artist asked four questions without waiting for an answer and there was a bit of fun for the rest of us as we watched the microphone being wrestled away from her. It’s nice to see passionate artists, but there is also something to be said for displaying a modicum of decorum in public.

Highlights from the presentation:

On obtaining publicity for clients:

Ross: “You do whatever you can for publicity.” He occasionally spends time in music chat rooms to see who is into which artists in local markets. “You call, write, give out 200 sampler CDs. It all builds for the future.”

Laski disagreed: “I don’t believe in artists giving out free samplers to fans. Make an EP and sell it for $5.”

Yeko: “We call music editors to get reviews and write-ups, but the main thing is to figure out your goals ahead of time. Under the right circumstances, you can’t give out too many flyers or CDs.”

Ross: “Writers across the country can be very helpful when bands come in from out of town.” He also recommends that you “get on-air appearances for your artists who are on tour. Call people, tell them why your artist will be good for their station or their club.” Taylor challenged him to give an example of how he talks to people on these calls. To much laughter, he said, “If I’m talking to a club, I always say the artist plays ‘good drinking music.'”

Laski: “There are different levels of publicity. At the start, you call reviewers. As you move up in sales, you hire a publicist to work a release or a tour, and you make certain he is in the proper genre of music. You can also call the BMI or ASCAP publicist, who can be helpful in getting contacts in the press.”

On preparing marketing plans for artists:

Yeko: “It’s helpful to list your goals, and the steps you need to take to achieve them. This is a good idea even if you don’t follow your plan exactly as it was written.”

Ross: “Unfortunately, marketing plans require marketing money.”

Laski: “Marketing plans are too time-consuming. We plan what we need to do as the need arises. Too many factors change as you go along.”

On touring:

Ross: “Outside of L.A., you can actually make some money.”

Laski: “Touring is going to be a losing proposition at the beginning of an artist’s career, unless you can get tour support from a record label.”

On making money for indie artists:

Laski: “We place songs on TV and film soundtracks. It not only makes some money for artists, it is excellent exposure.”

Yeko: “We have had great success with film and TV placement of songs, but some of our artists have developed clothing items and merchandise that actually generate more income at shows than CD sales.”

On artists looking for a magic formula for a breakthrough:

Yeko: “There is no shortcut to success other than hard work.”

Ross: “When you get those e-mails from people offering to set-up showcases, or the ones that tell you all about a great CD sampler they’re sending out, run away. These are never a good deal.”

On must-do lists for artists and managers:

Ross: “Whatever you receive from anyone, whether it’s a writer, club owner, or someone at retail, thank them!”

Yeko: “Look into the NACA, the National Association for Campus Activities at www.naca.org. We’ve also had an artist who did an entire summer of playing shopping malls.”

Ross: “When you send CDs to radio or press, remove the shrinkwrap. And do not send a CD to radio without a proper 1-sheet.” NOTE: you can download a PDF of a proper 1-sheet here: http://www.delvianrecords.com/onesheets/1S_Platinum_Radio.pdf

Oddly, the most provocative statement of the evening failed to draw any comment from the audience or the panelists. Taylor began the program with a prediction that “In the wake of industry changes such as the Sony/BMG mergerHealth Fitness Articles, indie record distribution may ultimately move from a single digit percentage to as much as 25 to 30 percent.” Perhaps this is really a prelude to the next LAMN or NARIP presentation.

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